Introduction

1.    The University Division came into being in Feb 2006 and has affiliation with University of Madras for providing M.Phil Degree to all those course officers/alumni/staff at NDC who meet the eligibility conditions as laid down by University of Madras.

2.    OIC University Division is a Service officer in rotation from one of the three services Army/Navy/Air Force. He is the link between NDC and University of Madras for processing all documents related to M.Phil registration starting with checking and ensuring eligibility of candidates, depositing of registration forms alongwith supporting documents to University of Madras including fees etc.

3.    All TYPED SCRIPT papers submitted towards the end of each study by the candidates during the course including the thesis are evaluated by internal and external examiners as applicable and complete processing till issue of degree is handled by the University Division of NDC.

4.    Finally the award of M.Phil degree parchment is carried out during a Convocation Ceremony held under the overall coord of OIC University Division at a suitable date after the M.Phil degree Certificates are received from the University of Madras.

M.Phil At a Glance

5.    Subject & Duration. M.Phil Degree in “Defence and Strategic Studies” and One year (Full Time) on voluntary basis.

Eligibility

6.    Officers must be on the posted strength of the NDC/attending NDC Course/NDC alumni. Post Graduate Degree or equivalent in any discipline with a minimum in aggregate, If qualified before 01 Jan 1991- 50% marks and after 01 Jan 1991 - 55% marks. Army Higher Command or equivalent Courses from three services and similar Foreign Staff Course will be considered equivalent to Post Graduate Degree.

Fee Structure

7.    Post Graduate from Indian University – Rs 5,000/- and Post Graduate from Foreign University - Rs 12,500/-. Cheque (payable at par)/DD in favour of “NDC UNIVERSITY DIVISION FUND” or by cash.

Syllabus, Examinations/Submission and Marks

S No Paper Examinations/Submission Marks
Part I
(a) Paper I - National Security 1000 +- 50 words typed script submission of six studies 100
(b) Paper II – Research Methodology Written Examination 100
(c) Paper III – On Area of Specialization i,e, Thesis 1000 +- 50 words typed script/typed submission 100
Part II
(d) Thesis on allotted subject 14000 words including bibliography and appendices typed submission 200
Total 500

Pass Percentage.

8.    Minimum 50% marks in each submission (all service papers, research methodology and thesis).

Guidelines for M.Phil

General

9.    University of Madras has accorded recognition to the National Defence College for award of M. Phil Degree in Defence and Strategic Studies vide University of Madras letter No. AII/ M PHIL (FT) Defence Studies/2006/1105 dated 23 Feb 2006.

Guide/Supervisor

10.  Candidates are placed under the Guides (Senior Directing Staff) approved by the University of Madras for supervision of their Research work. Candidates are advised to remain in constant touch with their respective Guide for necessary assistance in their Research work.

Course Contents

11.  The M. Phil Course (full time - One year), which runs concurrently with the NDC course on National Security & Strategic Studies, consists of two parts.
        (a)    Part I.     Examination/submissions on the following subjects for assessment: -
                  (i)      Paper –I - National Security (Typed script submissions)
                  (ii)     Paper –II - Research Methodology (Written Examination)
                  (iii)    Paper –III - On area of specialization (Thesis related submission)
        (b)    Part II.     Thesis on the allotted subject.

Assessment Procedure

12.   Part I.    All the SDSs are the internal examiners and the external examiners are approved during the Academic Council Meeting with the University officials. A system of continuous assessment by internal examiners is being followed. The assessment procedure is as appended below: -
        (a)   Paper I (National Security).     Continuous assessment would entail submission of 1000 +- 50 words service paper on the subject of study undertaken by the candidates during the course of each study, to the University Division as per the promulgated training programme. Thus, candidates would be required to submit a total of six service papers during the year, one during each study. Each paper will be assessed out of 100 marks and later an aggregate of 600 will be converted to 100 marks.

         (b)    Paper II (Research Methodology).     The assessment of this paper would be carried out under three headings, namely:-
                  (i)    Understanding of research methodology.
                  (ii)    Use of research methodology in developing the arguments in the Thesis.
                  (iii)   Effectiveness of research methodology tools employed.

       (c)     The written examination will also be conducted during the course on Research Methodology. Candidates are advised to refer to the Notes on Thesis Writing and other relevant books available in the library and apply these principles whilst planning and writing their thesis. A written test will be conducted and assessed out of 100 marks.

      (d)    Exemption of Written Test.     Paper II (Research Methodology) written paper is exempted to those officers who have scored 50% or more in Research Methodology during their Post Graduation. These officers need to bring this fact to the notice of OIC Univ Div and marks Sheet (copy) handed over.

      (e)    Paper III (On Area of Specialization i.e, Thesis).     The assessment of this paper will be done out of 100 marks under headings, namely:-

(I) Background to the Study - 25 Marks

- 25 Marks
- Upto 500 Words
(II) Hypothesis
(III) Detailed Outline - 50 Marks Upto 500 Words
Total - 100 Marks
          (f)    The total marks obtained would be converted into grading on the same lines as for thesis. Candidates are advised to stick to the schedule published in the Notes on Thesis writing and in the training programme. Delayed submission will attract negative marks of minus 2 per day.. The above requirements will be submitted to OIC University Division as per time lines issued in the weekly programme.

13.   Part II.     Thesis written by course officer is assessed as follows:-
         (a)     Internal Examiners (SDS). 100 Marks.
         (b)     External Examiners (HoD, DDSS, UoM/Nominated experts). 100 Marks.

14.   Overall marking system is as follows:-
         (a)     Part I.

                  (i)     Paper I - 100 Marks
                  (ii)    Paper II - 100 Marks @
                  (iii)   Paper III - 100 Marks
         (b)     Part II. 

                  (i)     Internal Examiner - 100 Marks
                  (ii)    External Examiner - 100 Marks.
            Total - 500 Marks @ {@400 marks for those officers who have obtained exemption from Paper II}

15.   Pass Percentage.     It is mandatory to score minimum 50% marks in each submission (all service papers, research methodology and thesis).

The grading system for Part I and II is in conformity with the requirement of the University of Madras. The grading system at the College is as shown below: -

Percentage Grade Classification Percentage Grade Classification
00% - 49.99% U Re-appear 75% – 79.99% D First Class with Distinction
50% – 54.99% B Second Class 80% – 84.99% D+
55% – 59.99% B+ 85% – 89.99% D++
60% – 64.99% A First Class 90% – 94.99% O First Class Exemplary
65% – 69.99% A+

Dissertation/ Thesis

16.   Two copies of the dissertation along with a soft copy are to be submitted to OIC University Division, duly approved and signed by respective SDS. The dissertation, besides being evaluated by the respective Supervisor/Guide, will also be evaluated by an external examiner approved during the Academic Council Meeting with the University officials.

Withdrawal from the Course

17.   Fees once paid will not be refunded by the University. Candidates desirous of joining the course will have to note that no refund will be given if a candidate withdraws after registration.

Conclusion

18.   M.Phil Degree is a stepping stone towards obtaining ‘DOCTORATE’ in the subject. The normal duration of Ph.D course is four years reduced by one year for M.Phil graduates. In addition, M.Phil graduates are not required to appear in the entrance test and Research Methodology paper when they apply for the Ph.D course.
19.   Although the syllabus for M.Phil course is considerably light, a detailed and systematic study spread over the complete duration is recommended. Candidates are advised to collect the prescribed reference books from the college library in time to derive maximum benefit.

Documents Required for Registration

20.   Application in the prescribed forms, duly completed. Two photocopies of Post Graduate Degree and Marks Sheet duly self attested or equivalent course certificate and marks sheet. One Passport size colour photo in civil clothes.

21.   If Post graduate degree and Marks Sheet or equivalent course certificate are in any foreign languages, those should be translated in English and attested by concerned Embassies or competent authority. Officers who possess Post Graduate Degree equivalent course certificate (e.g, HC/HDMC), they should submit two copies of Graduation Degree (eg, BA/B.Sc) and marks sheet also duly self attested.

22.   The fee may be paid by Local Cheque/Demand Draft in favour of “NDC, University Division Fund” or by cash.

Notes on Thesis Writing

Introduction

23.   Each participant of the NDC Course is required to write a thesis.

24.   These notes explain the norms, specify the assignments and provide guidelines for thesis writing. The notes are laid out in two parts as follows:

        (a)    Part I    Individual Thesis Assignment.
        (b)    Part II   Hand out on Thesis Writing.

Aim

 25.  The aim of the individual thesis is to enable Course Members to research and study a chosen subject of national or international interest and to make an original contribution to the existing knowledge on the subject.

Method and Scope

26.   While preparing a thesis, a course member will get an opportunity to study the selected subject in detail and would thus acquire some specialisation in the subject.

27.   A thesis, to be useful, has to be based on facts which are objectively analysed and interpreted.

28.   A computerised word count of the thesis will be presented at the end of the thesis. The thesis should reflect ability to present facts and points of view in a concise manner.

Selection of a Topic

29.   While selecting a topic the following points may be kept in view:
         (a)    The subject is of current national/international or service interest, for which source material is available in the College Library and can be supplemented from other libraries in Delhi.
         (b)    The research will be useful in subsequent service.
         (c)    The scope of the subject is limited both in time and in geographical area so that the study can be in some depth.
         (d)    The subject has a direct or significant bearing on National Security.

30.    The NDC has selected seven broad themes that will be researched by the NDC course participants. Each of these themes will be steered by a nominated SDS. In turn the SDS will allot sub themes/topic to each of the participants opting for a particular theme through an iterative process. However, each SDS will be able to guide only 14 to 15 participants hence all participants may not get their first choice of theme. The seven themes and suggested topics under them will be uploaded on NDC website before commencement of the course.

31.    The course participants will hand over their choice of selected three themes in the prescribed proforma at downloads. Allotment of theme for thesis topic will be put up on the Notice Board. There will be preliminary interaction with the SDS guide from 2nd/3rd week of Jan in the afternoon.

Outline

32.    An outline is to be prepared by the Course Members prior to the first discussion with the respective SDS. This will be followed by the synopsis of the thesis. This will form the basis for all subsequent work.

Senior Directing Staff in Charge

33.    Thesis will be prepared in consultation with Senior Directing Staff who will be available for advice and discussion. Their names will be notified along with allotment of themes.

Production of Thesis

34.    Timely submission of the thesis is the responsibility of the individual officer concerned. Computer facilities are available in the Library and Raksha Bhawan, which can be freely used.

Stationery

35.    Standard size (A4) typing paper available in the College will be supplied for production of the final thesis. Course Members are requested not to use any other size paper for this purpose. Course Members are also required to make their own arrangements for paper for manuscripts and draft typing, etc.

Review

36.    The thesis will be reviewed by the SDS in Charge, who will discuss the thesis with the member before putting it up to the Commandant for review. Copies of selected theses will be forwarded to the concerned Service Headquarters/Ministries/ Departments of the Government of India, and/or bound for permanent record and reference by the future courses. Some theses found suitable by the Editorial Board may also be published in the NDC Journal.

Reproduction of Theses

37.    Theses, once submitted, become the property of the College. Hence, reproduction or re use of the theses for any other purpose like publishing in other journals and periodicals or submission to some other University for acquiring higher qualifications are subject to the specific sanction and approval of the Commandant, NDC/ Madras University. Further, such sanction will only convey that the NDC / Madras University does not have any objection to such reproduction or re use and it may be noted that any other clearance that the Course Member may require from his/her Department or Service for such re use is invariably obtained by the officer himself/herself.

PART II
THESIS WRITING

Basic Considerations for Writing of Thesis

38.    The structure and layout to be adopted in documenting a thesis in orderly fashion is given at downloads. The principles to be kept in mind are:
       (a)    Accuracy.     There is need for accuracy in facts and figures. In this context, exaggeration, over emphasis and implied statements are inaccuracies.
     (b)   Brevity.     Brevity means the ability to inform the reader in the shortest possible time without sacrificing clarity, completeness or style. This is not to be confused with abruptness or ‘telegraphs’.
         (c)     Clarity.     Not only should individual words or phrases be clear and unambiguous in meaning, but the sense of the whole should be easy to understand at the first reading.
       (d)    Relevance.     This includes both the exclusion of any irrelevant work, phrase or idea, and the inclusion of all pertinent essentials.
        (e)     Logic.     The ideas must not be contradictory to each other and the sentences and paragraphs should be linked together. Similarly, each part of the thesis must flow logically out of the previous one.
        (f)      Style.     Slang should be avoided. Similarly, jargons and 'officialism' mars a good style.
     (g)  Plagiarism.     Thesis are to be scanned for plagiarism on the anti plagiarism web utility ‘TURNITIN’ prior to submission. Plagiarism is viewed very seriously and if detected will result in the course participant being barred from submitting the thesis in addition to disciplinary action being taken.
        (h)     Research Methodology.     Books on Research Methodology are available in the library for reference.

Briefing on Thesis Writing

39.    Additional details about structure and format of the thesis will be provided during the briefing on thesis writing by HoD, Defence and Strategic Studies, Univ of Madras.

Format of the Thesis

40.    The format to be used and guidelines for final submission of the thesis are at downloads. The length of the thesis should be restricted to less than 14000 words, as follows:-
          (a)     Main Text - 10,000-12,000 words (Word count)
          (b)     Appendices & Bibliography - not more than 2,000 words.

Final Submission

41.     Course Members should hand over two copies of the thesis along with a CD to OIC University Division (date will be intimated during course). Satisfactory completion and timely submission of thesis is a requirement for NDC qualification. All theses submitted after time schedule are to be forwarded to OIC University Division with a covering note from the respective SDS. The note is to contain reasons for the delay and recommendation regarding condoning of the delay. Such theses will NOT be considered for award of prize.

Assessment

42.     All theses will be assessed in accordance with the scheme of awarding marks for various aspects by the SDS concerned and the Commandant. The assessment will be carried out for the following purposes: -
          (a)     Reference to concerned organisations/ Ministries/ departments.
          (b)     Selection for publication.
          (c)     Award of MPhil degree, consideration for Colonel Pyara Lal Medal and book prizes.

Downloads

         FORM FOR M.PHIL REGN

         SYLLABUS

         TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

         FORMAT FOR EXERCISING TOPICS

         STRUCTURE OF THESIS

         SETTINGS FOR THESIS PRINTING

         COVER PAGE OF THESIS

         COVER PAGE OF TYPED SCRIPT SERVICE PAPER

For any clarifications, please contact:-

         OIC/Univ Div
         National Defence College
         6, Tees January Marg
         New Delhi – 110 011
         India

         Tele: (+91) 011 23014912
         Email: oicunivdiv[dot]ndc[dash]mod[at]nic[dot]in

Guidelines for Thesis Writing

Introdution

1.       Each participant of the NDC Course is required to write a thesis . While preparing a thesis, a course member will get an opportunity to study the selected subject in detail and would thus acquire some specialisation in it.

2.       These notes explain the norms, specify the assignment and provide guidelines for thesis writing. The notes are laid out in two parts as follows:

       (a) Part‑I - Individual Thesis Assignment.

       (b) Part‑II ‑ Hand out on Thesis Writing.

PART ‑ I

INDIVIDUAL THESIS ASSIGNMENT

Aim

3. The aim of the individual thesis is to enable Course Members to research and study a chosen subject of national or international interest and to make an original contribution to the existing knowledge on the subject.

Selection of a Topic

4. While selecting a topic the following points may be kept in view:‑

       (a) It is challenging.

       (b) It is unique.

       (c) It adds to the existing knowledge.

       (d) It has a direct or a significant bearing on National Security and is of current national/ international interest.

       (e) Its scope is limited both in time period and geography to enable in depth analysis.

5. The College has selected seven broad themes for the course members. Each of these themes will be steered by a nominated SDS. In turn, the SDS will allot a sub theme / topic to each participant through an interactive process. However, each SDS can only guide 14 to 15 members and hence all may not get their first choice.


6. The selected themes are as follows :-

S No

Theme No

Themes

Remarks

(a)

I

Australia, ASEAN, China, East Asia, CAR : Geo-Politics, Economy, Security, Bi-lateral Relations

SDS (FS)

(b)

II

Russia, EU, Middle East, Africa, Americas : Geo- Politics, Economy , Security, Bi-lateral Relations

SDS (Air)

(c)

III

Strategic Neighbourhood : Geo-Politics, Economy, Security, Bi-lateral Relations.

SDS (Army-III)

(d)

IV

IOR (Regional Economic & Security Forums, Maritime Economy), International Organisations, Global Commons, Military Diplomacy

SDS (Navy)

(e)

V

India : Socio-Political issues, Governance issues, Economy (Trade, Finance, Agriculture, Infrastructure, Health)

SDS (CS)

(f)

VI

India : Energy Sector (Production, Procurement, Distribution - Conventional/ Renewable), Technology - Impact & Development of AI, Big Data, Robotics, 5G, Economy (Service Sector, Manufacturing)

SDS (Army-I)

(g)

VII

India : National Security Strategy & Structures, Internal Security, Military Capacity Building (Higher Defence Re-organisation, Defence Plans, Procurement, Manufacturing, Budget)

SDS (Army-II)

7. All members will hand over their choice of selected themes in the prescribed Proforma at Appendix A to OIC University Division by 20 Jan 2020. Allotment of theme for thesis topic will be put up on the Notice Board on 24 Feb 2020.

Outline

8. An outline is to be prepared by each member prior to the preliminary discussion with their respective SDS. The preliminary interaction with the SDS guide will be during the 1 st/2nd week of Feb in the afternoon. This will be followed by the synopsis of the thesis and form the basis for all subsequent work.

SDS in Charge

9. The thesis is to be prepared in consultation with the SDS, who will be available for advice and discussion. The names of the SDS will be notified alongwith allotment of themes.

Submission of Thesis

10. Timely submission of the thesis is the responsibility of the each member. Computer facilities are available in the Library and Raksha Bhawan, which can be freely used. Any additional assistance necessary is to be sought through the respective SDS.

Stationery

11. Standard size (A4) typing paper available in the College will be supplied for the final thesis. You are requested not to use any other size paper and are expected to make your arrangements for paper for additional manuscripts, drafts, etc.

Time Schedule

12. The schedule given below is followed to ensure a timely submission of the thesis. Changes if any, will be intimated in weekly training program issued by Training Section. All activities are to be with the allotted SDS guides: ‑

(a) Members submit their themes choice - 20 Jan

Proforma to OIC University Division

(b) Preliminary interaction with SDS Guide - 27 Jan to 31 Jan

(c) SDS Guides to finalise allocation of - 19 Feb

topics for Commandant’s approval

(d) Final allotment of topics - 24 Feb

(e) First discussion on detailed outline - 25 Feb to 28 Feb

(alongwith background to the study and hypothesis)

(f) First discussion for review of progress - 02 Mar to 13 Mar

(g) Second discussion for review of progress - 08 Apr to 17 Apr

(h) Presentation of thesis by Members - 22 Jul to 11 Aug within selected groups

(dates are to be coord with respective SDS)

(l) Two copies of the thesis in loose sheets (no tagging, no punching), including the abstract, alongwith a CD containing the Thesis in PDF+ Word format are to be handed over to OIC University Division by 14 Sep 2020.

Review by SDS Guide

13. The SDS Guide will discuss the thesis with the member before putting it up to the Commandant for review. Copies of specially selected theses will be forwarded to the concerned Service Headquarters / Ministries / Departments of the Government of India, and / or bound for permanent record and reference by the future courses. Theses found suitable by the Editorial Board would also be published in the NDC Journal.

Reproduction of Theses

14. Theses, once submitted, become the property of the College. Hence, reproduction or re‑use of the theses for any other purpose, like publishing in other journals and periodicals, or submission to some other University for acquiring higher qualifications, can only be done on the specific sanction and approval of the Commandant, NDC / Madras University . Further, such sanction will only convey that the NDC / Madras University does not have any objection to such reproduction or re‑use. It is clarified that any other clearance that the Member may require from his / her Department or Service, for such re‑use, is to be obtained by the individual member.



PART‑II

THESIS WRITING

1. Important Instructions

(a) Layout of Thesis. The basic layout of thesis to be followed is given at Appendix B.

(b) Research Methodology. Books on Research Methodology (RM) are available in the library for reference. The Thesis must adhere norms of RM.

(c) Plagiarism. Thesis will be scanned for plagiarism on the anti plagiarism web utility ‘TURNITIN’, prior to submission. Plagiarism is viewed very seriously and if detected more than permissible limit of 15% will result in the course participant being barred from submitting the thesis, in addition to disciplinary action being taken. The report generated by TURNITIN is to be submitted to the SDS Guide alongwith a computerised word count.

(d) Footnotes/ Bibliography. The use of footnotes and bibliography are an integral part of thesis writing. Sample illustration of same is at Appendices C & D.

2. Format of the Thesis (For M. Phil & NDC Course)

The format for final submission of the thesis is atAppendices E & F. Officers doingonly NDC course are to use the cover page atAppendix E. Officers doing both NDC course and M Phil from University of Madras, will use the cover pages at Appendix F for thesis submitted. Acknowledgment to be attach in thesis is given atAppendix G. The length of the thesisshould be restricted to maximum 14000 words.

      (a) Main text - Maximum 12,000 words (Word count)

      (b) Appendices & Bibliography - Maximum 2,000 words.

3. Thesis Abstract.

A 150 – 250 word thesis abstract is to be submitted to the University Division alongwith the thesis. A guide to good abstract writing is given at Appendix H.

4. Guidelines for Thesis submission on CD

The guidelines for submission of thesis on a CD are given at Appendix J.

5. Assessment

All theses will be assessed in accordance with assessment scheme by the SDS guide and the Commandant, and is given at Appendix K. The assessment is mandatory for the following: -

      (a) Award of NDC Parchment.

      (b) Award of M. Phil degree.

      (c) Consideration for Colonel Pyara Lal Medal and book prizes.

      (d) Forwarding to concerned organisations/ Ministries/ departments.

      (e) Selection for publication in NDC journal.

6. Qualifying Marks.

. The assessment of thesis will be out of 100 marks. The minimum passing percentage required for the NDC parchment and M.Phil degree is 50%

7. Final Submission

Course Members are to hand over two copies of the thesis, the abstract and a CD containing the thesis inpdf / word format to the OIC University Divisionby 1400 hrs on 14 Sep 2020 duly approved and signed by the SDS guide. Theses are not to be stapled / pinned, but held in place using binder clips . CDs and clips may be collected from the Training Section. Satisfactory completion and timely submission of thesis is a mandatory requirement for NDC qualification. Any thesis submitted after the due date, is to be forwarded to the OIC University Division alongwith a covering note from the respective SDS. The note is to contain reasons for the delay and a request for condonation. Such theses will NOT be considered for award of Col Pyara Lal Memorial Medal, Book Prizes or publication.


Appendix ‘A’

FORMAT FOR CHOICE OF THEMES PROFORMA

(To be handed over to University Division by 1400 hrs on 20 Jan 2020)

Rank_______ Name__________________________________Locker No_______

Themes

Theme No.

Theme

SDS Guide

I

Australia, ASEAN, China, East Asia, CAR : Geo-Politics, Economy, Security, Bi-lateral Relations

SDS

(FS)

II

Russia, EU, Middle East, Africa, Americas : Geo- Politics, Economy , Security, Bi-lateral Relations

SDS

(Air)

III

Strategic Neighbourhood : Geo-Politics, Economy, Security, Bi-lateral Relations.

SDS

(Army-III)

IV

IOR (Regional Economic & Security Forums, Maritime Economy), International Organisations, Global Commons, Military Diplomacy

SDS

(Navy)

V

India : Socio-Political issues, Governance issues, Economy (Trade, Finance, Agriculture, Infrastructure, Health)

SDS (CS)

VI

India : Energy Sector (Production, Procurement, Distribution - Conventional/ Renewable), Technology - Impact & Development of AI, Big Data, Robotics, 5G, Economy (Service Sector, Manufacturing)

SDS

(Army-I)

VII

India : National Security Strategy & Structures, Internal Security, Military Capacity Building (Higher Defence Re-organisation, Defence Plans, Procurement, Manufacturing, Budget)

SDS

(Army-II)

Choice of theme (Mention Theme number)

(a) First Choice :

(b) Second Choice:

(c) Third Choice :

Addl Choice/ Reserve (Optional)

(d) Addl Choice :

(Signature) _______________

Dated : ___________________



Appendix ‘B’

THESIS LAYOUT

1. The layout of the thesis is to be in three parts – Preliminaries, Main Body and Reference Matter. All pages are to have “RESTRICTED” at the Header and Footer and page numbered in the top centre.

(A) Preliminaries. Sequence of contents:-

      (i) Cover Page (As per Appendix E or F)

      (ii) Self Declaration Certificate And Certificate by SDS (As per Appendix E or F)

      (iii) Abstract : Guide at Appendix H.

      (iv) Acknowledgement : Sample at Appendix G.

      (v) Table of Contents.

      (vi) List of Appendices, Tables and Illustrations.

      (vii) Glossary.

      (viii) List of Abbreviations.

(B) Main Body.

      (i) Introduction.

          (aa) Background to the study with a brief justification.

          (ab) Statement of the problem.

          (ac) Aim & objectives.

          (ad) Hypothesis.

          (ae) Scope of the study.

          (af) Organisation of thesis / chapterisation.

      (ii) Body of Thesis Data and analysis arranged in chapters & sections.

      (iii) Conclusion.

          (aa) Conclusion.

          (ab) Findings.

          (ac) Areas of further study, as applicable.

      (iv)Recommendation, if any

(C) Reference Matter.

      (i) Appendices. (Relevant chapter No. and page No. to be mentioned at top right hand corner of the each appendix).

     (ii) Bibliography.

2. Page Numbering. All pages are to be numbered serially at the centre top 12 mm from the top edge, as explained below.

      (a) Preliminaries. Pages prior to Chapter 1 should be in lower case Roman numerals. The cover page is considered to be page (i) but the number is not printed.

      (b) Main Body. Beginning with the first page of the text in the thesis (Chapter 1), all pages should be numbered consecutively and consistently in Arabic numerals, though the Appendices/ Bibliography.

      (c) Reference Matter. The numbering of pages pertaining to Reference Matter is in continuation with that of the main body.

      (d) Every new chapter will start on a new page.

      (e) The thesis text is to be written only on one side of the page.

      (f) The thesis must be printed in black text (colour for images, if necessary). All pages of thesis must be with uniformly spaced characters, lines and margins on every page, and printed only on the college supplied paper.

      (g) The thesis should be free from typographical errors.

3. Page Setup

      (a) The paper recommended for the thesis is Normal white A4 size and the margins should be as follows for both textual and non-textual (e.g., figures, tables) pages:-

      Margin Top ‘1 inch’ Left ‘1 inch’

      Bottom‘1 inch’ Right ‘1 inch’

      Gutter ‘0’ Gutter position : Left

4. Font.

      (a) Font size - 14

      (b) Font Size for Footnotes - 10

      (c) Font - Times New Roman

5. Spacing

      (a) 1.5” line space

      (b) After and before central heading - two spaces.

      (c) Before group heading two space and after group heading one space required.

      (d) Paragraph spacing - ‘0’ Tab spacing ‘0.5’

      (e) Sub para - ‘0.5’ Tap spacing ‘1.0’

      (f) A Sub-head at the bottom of the page should have at least two full lines of content below it. If the sub-head is too short to allow this, it should begin on the next page.

      (g) Leave two spaces after the full stop and quotation marks and one space after brackets before starting the next sentence.

      (h) Footnotes should be single spaced with double space between every consecutive note. A solid line is to separate notes from the text above. Leave a double space between this line and the last line of the text above.

6. Heading.

      (a) Central Heading - Capital letter, bold and underlined.

      (b) Group Heading - Title case, bold and underlined.



Appendix ‘C’

USE OF FOOTNOTES

1. Footnotes are the acceptable method of acknowledging material which is not your own when you use it. Basically, footnoted material is of three types:

      (a) Direct quotations from another author’s work (These must be placed in quotation marks).

      (b) Citing authority for statements which are not quoted directly.

      (c) Material of an explanatory nature which does not fit into the flow of the body of the text.

2. In the text of an essay, material to be footnoted should be marked with a raised number immediately following the words or ideas that are being cited.

EXAMPLE

“The only aspect of Frontenac’s conduct the King... did not condemn was his care for military security,” Eccles stated, condemning Frontenac’s administration.²

The footnotes may be numbered in sequence on each page or throughout the entire essay.

Form and Content of Footnotes

3. From a book

¹W.J. Eccles, Frontenac The Courtier Governor (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited, 1559), 14. [The information given in a footnote includes the author, the title, the place of publication, the publisher, the date of publication and the page or pages on which the quotation or information is found.]

4. Form an Article in a Journal

¹Peter Blickle, “Peasant Revolts in the German Empire in the Late Middle Ages,” Social History, Vol. IV, No 2 (May, 1979), 233.

5. From a Book Containing Quotations from Other Sources

¹Eugene A. Forsey, “Was the Governor General’s Refusal Constitutional?”, cited in Paul Fox, Politics: Canada (Toronto: Mcgraw-Hill Company of Canada Ltd., 1966), 186.

6. From a Standard Reference Work

¹Norman Ward, “Saskatchewan,” in the Canadian Encyclopaedia, 2nd ed., Vol. 3, 1935.

²J.K. Johnson and P. B. Waite, “Macdonald, Sir John Alexander,” in The Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. 12, 559.

7. From the Internet

In citing material read on the Internet, it is not sufficient to indicate the website alone. You must provide information about author, title, and date of the document you are using, as follows:

¹T. J. Pritzker, (1993). “An Early Fragment from Central Nepal” [Online]. Available: http://www.ingress.com/~astanart/pritzker/pritzker.html [1995 , June].

The final date [1995, June] is the date the website was consulted.

For more information about how to cite electronic information see Xia Li and Nancy Crane, The Handbook for Citing Electronic Resources or http://www.uvm.edu/~ncrane/estyles/ .

8. Rules to Remember in Writing Footnotes

      (a) Titles of books, journals or magazines should be underlined or italicized.

      (b) Titles of articles or chapters - items which are only a part of a book - are put in quotation marks.

9. Abbreviation in Footnotes

The first time any book or article is mentioned in a footnote, all the information requested above must be provided. After that, however, there are shortcuts which should be used:

      (a) Several quotations in sequence from the same book:

The abbreviation to be used is “Ibid.,” a Latin word meaning “in the same.” (Notice that Ibid. Is not underlined). Ibid. Can be used by itself, if you are referring to the same page as the previous footnote does, or it can be combined with a page number or numbers.

¹Gerald Friesen, The Canadian Prairies: A History (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1984), 78.

²Ibid.

³Ibid., 351.

      (b) Reference to a source that already has been cited in full form but not in the reference immediately preceding, is made by using the author’s last name (but not the first name or initials unless another author of the same surname has been cited), the title--in shortened form, if desired--and the page number.

Example

¹ William Kilbourn, The Firebrand (Toronto: Clark, Irwin and Company Limited, 1956), 35.

² John L. Tobias, “Canada’s Subjugation of the Plains Cree, 1879-1885,”in Sweet Promises: A Reader on Indian-White Relations in Canada, ed. J. R. Miller (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1991), 224.

³Kilbourn, The Firebrand, 87.

4 Tobias, “Canada’s Subjugation of the Plains Cree,”226.



Appendix - ‘D’

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. The Basic Entry : A Book by a Single Author

Wilson, Frank R The Fland : Flow Its Use Shaper the Brain, Language and Human Culture. New York; Pantheon, 1998.

2. Two of More by the Same Author

Borroff, Marine. Language and the past: Vertical Artist in frost, Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 1979.

___________ ed. The Double Vision. Chicago : University of Chicago Press 1979.

3. An Article in a Reference Book

“Azimuthal Equidistant Projection, ‘Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary 10th ed’. 1993.

4. Cross-References

Sexton, Andrea Wyatt and Alice Leccese Powers, eds. ‘The Brooklyn Reader: Thirty Writers Celebrate America’s Favourite Borough’. New York: Harmony, 1994.

5. A Multivolume Work

Blanco, Richard L. Ed. ‘The American Revolution’, 1775-1783: An Encyclopaedia. 2 Vols. Hamden: Garland, 1993.

6. A Book in a Series

Charriere, Isabelle de. Letters of Mistress Henley, Published by Her Friend. Trans Phillip Stewart and Jean Vache. Texts and Trans 1 New York: MLA, 1993.

7. A Pamphlet

London : New York: Trip Builder, 1996.

8. A Government Publication

Great Britain, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food. National Food Survey. London: MFISO, 1993.

9 The Published Proceedings of a Conference

Freed, Barhara F., ed. Foreign Language Acquisition. Research and the classroom. Proc. Of consortium for Lang. Teaching and learning cong., Oct 1989, U of Pennsylvania, exington : Health, 1991.

10. A Book Published Before 1900

Brome, Richard. The Dramatic works of Richard Brome. 3 Vols. Landon, 1873.

11. The Basic Entry : An Article in a Scholarly Journal with Continuous Pagination

Most, Andrea. ‘We know we belong to the Land’: The Theatricality of Assimilation in Rodgers and Hommerstein’s Oklahoma!’ PKLA113 (1998) : pp. 77-89.

12. An Article in a Scholarly Journal that uses only Issue Numbers

Bowering, George. ‘Baseball and the Canadian Imagination.’ Canadian Literature 08 (1986): pp. 115-24.

13. An Article in a Newspaper

Lohr, steve. “Now playing: Babes in cyberspace. New York Times 3 Apr. 1998, late ed.: C1+.

14. An Article in a magazine

Mehta, Pratap B hanu. “Exploding Myths.” New Republic. 6. June 1998: pp. 17-19.

15. A Review

Rev. of Anthology of Danish Literature, ed.F.J. Billeskov Jansen and RM. Mitchell. Times Literary Supplement 7 Jul 1972: 785.

16. An Editorial

“Death of Writer”. Editorial. New York Times 20 Apr. 1994, Late ed: A18.

17. A Special Issue

Appiah, Kwame Authon, and Hendry Louis Gates, Jr., eds. Identities. Spec, issue of Critical Inquiry 18.4 (1992): 625.884. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1995.

18. A Television or Radio Program

The Buccaneers. By Edit Wharton. Adopt. Maggie Wadey. Perf. Mira Sorvino, Alison Elliott, and Carla Gugino. 3. Epsodes. Masterpiece Theatre. Indrod. Russell Baker. PBS. WGBH, Bosten.27 Apr.-11 May1997.

19. A Film or Video Recording

It is a wonderful Life. Dir.Frank Capra. Perf. James Stewart, Donna Read, Lionel Barrymore, and Thomas Mitchell. RKO, 1946.

20. An Interview

Blackmun, Harry. Interview with Ted Koppel and Nina Totenberg. Nightline. ABC. WABC, New York. 5 Apr. 1994.

21. A Lecture, a Speech, an Address, or a Reading

Atwood, Margaret. “Silencing the Scream”. Boundaries of the Imagination Forum. MLA convention. Royal York Hotel, Toronto 29 Dec. 1993. A Legal Source

Pesticide Monitoring Improvements Act of 1998. Pub.L100-418. 23 Aug 1988. Stat. 102.1412.

22. An online Scholarly Project, Information Database, or Professional or Personal Site

Britannica online. Vers. 98.2. Apr. 1998. Encyclopedia Britannica. <http:www.eb.com/>. (accessed on 08 May 1998)

23. An Online Book

Austene Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Ed. Henry Churchyard 1996. 10 Sept. 1998 http://www.Pemberley.Com/Janeinto/Pridprij.html . (accessed on 18 May 1996)

24. An Articles in an online Periodical

“Endangered Species Act Upheld.” Ap online 22 June 1998. 22 June 1998 http://www.aytimes.eom/aponeline/w/Ap.Court – Endangere - Species-html>. (accessed on 22 Jun 1998)

25. A Publication on CD-Rom, Diskette, or Magnetic Tapes

Braunmuller, A.R., ed. Macbeth by William Shakespeare. CD - rom. New York: Voyager. 1994

26. Other Electronic Sources

Fiskin, fred. “Privacy and the Net.” Boot camp. CBS Radio. WCBS, New York.

5 March 1998. 29 June 1998 http://newsradio88.com/boot/archive/march.1998/march 5.html (accessed on 12 Jun 16)

27. On-Line Government Document

United States.U.S Census Bureau. Poverty in the United States: 1998. Sep 1999. 12 Nov. 1999 http://www. Census.gov.prod/99pubs/p60-207.pdf. (accessed on 17 Jan 17)



Appendix E
Locker No.: .........
Copy No. : One

THESIS TITLE

A Thesis submitted to the National Defence College, New Delhi.

BY

COURSE OFFICER’S NAME

NATIONAL DEFENCE COLLEGE

SIXTIETH NDC COURSE - 2020

Senior Directing Staff in charge – NAME OF SDS, SDS ( )



(For NDC parchment only)

SELF DECLARATION CERTIFICATE

     I declare that the dissertation “……………………………………….”, is submitted by me for the award of NDC parchment in original and that this work or a part thereof has not been submitted for the award of any Degree or Diploma of either this or any other University.



NDC, New Delhi                                                                                                                                                                              (Name)

Date :                                                                                                                                                                                                 Rank



CERTIFICATE

1.          This is to certify that the dissertation “………………………………”, submitted for the award of NDC Parchment is the part of the original research work carried out by ……………………under my supervision.

2.          To the best part of my knowledge, no part of this dissertation has been submitted for any other Degree or Diploma.



NDC, New Delhi                                                                                                                                                                              Signature

Date :                                                                                                                                                                                                Supervisor SDS



Appendix F
Locker No.: ......
Copy No. : .........

THESIS TITLE

A Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for award of M. Phil (Defence & Strategic Studies) Degree at the National Defence College,

New Delhi, affiliated to the University of Madras.

BY

COURSE OFFICER’S NAME

NATIONAL DEFENCE COLLEGE

SIXTIETH NDC COURSE - 2020

Senior Directing Staff in charge – NAME OF SDS, SDS ( )



(For NDC & M Phil Degree)



SELF DECLARATION CERTIFICATE

I declare that the dissertation “………………………………….”, is submitted by me for the award of M. Phil degree in Defence and Strategic Studies of the University of Madras in original and that this work or a part thereof has not been submitted for the award of any Degree or Diploma of either this or any other University.



NDC, New Delhi                                                                                                                                                                              (Name)

Date :                                                                                                                                                                                                 Rank



CERTIFICATE

1.          This is to certify that the dissertation “……………………………..”, submitted for the award of Degree of Master of Philosophy in Defence and Strategic Studies by the University of Madras is the part of the original research work carried out by ……………………under my supervision.

2.          To the best part of my knowledge, no part of this dissertation has been submitted for any other Degree or Diploma.

NDC, New Delhi Signature

Date: Supervisor SDS


Appendix ‘G’

SAMPLE ACKNOWLEDGMENT


This thesis draws heavily on my experience with various departments ……………. I am most grateful for this rich experience and the opportunity to interact and learn from my many able superiors and colleagues.

………………………………………………….has been instrumental in getting me launched on this study. He has also been a constant source of inspiration due to his wide vision and incisive analysis of various issues.

………………………………………..has been a major influence because of his enthusiastic support and timely inputs on various academic issues. Thanks are also due to ……………..for his constant support and his fresh insight into various stubborn problems.

My deep gratitude goes to my wife ……for providing a conducive environment and her precise sense of language contributed to the final copy. I am grateful to all my colleagues at the …………..who were always ready to share their varied experiences with me.

I cannot end without acknowledging the cheerful and competent support of all people in my office who went out of the way to reduce my burden of research work and providing far superior typing and formatting skills than I could have managed on my own. They are too many to mention and I only name ………………………….to indicate the direction of my gratitude.



Appendix ‘H’

A GUIDE TO GOOD ABSTRACT WRITING FOR JOURNAL ARTICLES

1. Writing a article for journal publication can be a daunting task for young inexperienced authors. Although all sections of a manuscript are important and should be well written, the abstract is usually the first section to be read and its content can either attract or repel a reader. Despite the emphasis given to good manuscript preparation and guidelines provided, many authors still find it hard to produce manuscripts that are compelling or abstracts that are enticing to readers. This will be an interesting resource for both experienced and amatuer authors aspiring to write journal articles for publication.

2. An understanding of the meaning and purpose of an article abstract is important to good abstract writing. An abstract has been defined as "(A) brief summary of a research article that emphasizes what is new, captures the salient features of the purpose, design, findings, and implications, and contains no unnecessary sentences or explanations." The purpose of the article abstract is to make it easy for readers to quickly grasp the key points of the article. This will help them determine their interest in the article and/ or its relevance to their work. As a brief summary, the abstract is expected to be an exact reflection of the content of the main text. It should not contain any information that is not presented in the main text, neither is it expected to exclude vital findings or shortcomings of the research. The emphasis should be on the novel features of the article, and it should be presented logically along the lines of the sections of the article's main text. This includes context and background, objectives, the setting of the research, work done or materials and methods, findings/results, and conclusions from the results.

3. As a rule, abstracts do not include citations, figures or tables; however the format of an abstract may vary from discipline to discipline and from journal to journal. Some features of a journal article's abstract distinguish it from conference abstracts designed for oral or poster presentation. These features, among others, include that journal abstracts could be indexed in academic databases while conference abstracts are not so indexed, some journals do not allow conference abstract citation in their articles, and often conference abstracts are not recognized as publications in the same manner articles are treated.

4. In a nutshell, the following are the some guidelines for writing a good journal abstract-

       (a) It is a brief summary of completed or ongoing research article.

       (b) It includes information on the context or background of the study.

       (c) It states the rationale for the study

       (d) It has clear objectives/project statement

       (e) It has a succinct presentation of the work done

       (f) It contains clear and logical presentation of findings.

       (g) Its conclusions are supported by the results

       (h) It includes a take-home message or statement of impact.

       (i) It has been written according to journal guidelines: - structured or unstructured, word limit, etc.

       (j) It has good grammatical writing.



Appendix ‘J’

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION OF THESIS ON CD

1.        Thesis must be submitted on CD with name and locker number of the Course Member written on it.

2.        Microsoft Word 2007 and later versions to be used.

3.        The complete thesis is to be saved in three files. The first file will contain the preliminaries, second file will have main text of thesis which will also be used for the word count and the third file is to contain only the Appendices and Bibliography. The files are to be named as , Preliminaries – Locker XX, Main Text – Locker XX and Bibliography – Locker XX where XX represent the Locker Numbers (namely, 01, 26, 38, etc.).

4.        It must be ensured that ‘final version’ of the thesis is copied on the CD and is readable. The submission of the thesis will be considered incomplete if it is not accompanied with a readable CD.

5.        Scan the CD for viruses prior to submission.

6.        In case of any difficulty, the Course Members may please contact GSO (Systems).



Appendix ‘K’

CONFIDENTIAL

FORMAT FOR ASSESSMENT OF THESIS




1. Course Member's Name:                                                            Locker No.

2. Subject:


3. Evaluation                                                                                       Max. Mks                                                                             Mks. Awarded

(a) Presentation                                                                                - 10 Marks                                                                                   _______

(b) Viva-voce                                                                                      - 10 Marks                                                                                   _______

(c) Subject Content                                                                           - 20 Marks                                                                                   _______

(d) Analysis                                                                                         - 20 Marks                                                                                   _______

(e) Recommendations                                                                      - 20 Marks                                                                                   _______

(f) Bibliographical skill                                                                      - 10 Marks                                                                                   _______

(g) Interaction with Guide                                                                - 10 Marks                                                                                   _______

Total                                                                                                    - 100 Marks

4. Negative marking may be given by the SDS i/c, whenever the length of the thesis exceeds 12,000 words.

5. Comments by SDS. (Strengths and Weaknesses of the Thesis)



CONFIDENTIAL

6. Recommendations

       (a) Library Reading                                                                                                   :      Fit/Unfit

       (b) For publication                                                                                                    :      Fit/Unfit

       (c) Whether security screening required?                                                            :      Yes/No

       (d) For despatch to Service HQs/Ministries                                                         :      Fit/Unfit



                                                                                                                                                                        (Signature of SDS)



7. Commandant's Remarks








                                                                                                                                                                        (Signature of Commandant)

8. Grading

S.No

Percentage

Grade

S.No

Percentage

Grade

(a)

0% - 49.99%

U (Re-appear)

(b)

50% – 54.99%

B

(c)

55% – 59.99%

B+

(d)

60% – 64.99%

A

(e)

65% – 69.99%

A+

(f)

70% – 74.99%

A++

(g)

75% – 79.99%

D

(h)

80% – 84.99%

D+

(j)

85% – 89.99%

D++

(k)

90% – 94.99%

O

(l)

95% & Above

O+

(To be returned to OIC University Division)